Ahem.

Notice anything here?

That’s right, Your Humble Scribe is now a published translator, as well as author, poet, blogger, and general nogoodnik. And my genial publisher, Richard Grabman, is looking for people to review this work. We’re hoping to get people from all over the world interested in Lupita’s memoir, and reviews into major publications all across the globe. E-mail him for further details.

Here’s the backstory on the book (and my small role in it), from Richard’s own blog, The Mex Files.

And for those looking to buy the book, here’s where to get it: Amazon.ca, Amazon.com, and IPG. The last link also deals in e-books.

Happy reading!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
This entry was posted in A Bit of a Brag..., Found in Translation, Mexican Standoffs, Uppity Wimmin, Writer Lady Sings the Blues. Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Ahem.

  1. Antonia says:

    Congrats!

  2. Slave Revolt says:

    Good luck and best vibes directed toward success with this literary contribution.

    I sincerely say this with not a wit of snark.

    But, given the title, and your earned and long-standing, pro-human and anti-patriarchical credentials–is it wise to ally with a guy named “Grabman” to kick off this endeavor?

    Lol–just putting this out there, Bina…

    • Sabina Becker says:

      LOL! I had completely forgotten about that. But yeah, his name is a total coincidence. His main stock in trade is Mexican history books for regular folks.

  3. Slave Revolt says:

    Well, joking aside, I know that you alined your effort and intellect with this work because it says somethings important about our context at this moment, and it is likely to be a compelling encounter for anyone that enters this story.

    Translation is an interesting process–as inclinations color the process, and this is what makes it interesting to consider and reflect upon..

    Hopefully, this will resound positively as we move forward.

    • Sabina Becker says:

      You’re right about that…it was an emotional journey for me. There’s a lot in it that will make the reader think: reflections on double standards, machista cultures, hypocrisy, the Mexican drug wars, murder, and sexual abuse…they’re all in there. It’s not titillating; it’s hard-hitting. I’m proud to be part of this!

  4. Slave Revolt says:

    I comment far Less frequently than years past–but, indeed, yours are some of few reflections and interpretations of unfolding events that I find valuable enough to regularly review and reflect upon.

    Such are the pathetic patterns of ignorance that prevail under the onslaught of staggering vapidity and obsequiousness that marks the age–where positive feed-back loops of monetary rewards and punishments truncate and bend the horizons of the commodified and denuded popular imagination toward enslavement. Thinking about thinking slowly becomes subversive.

    Masses are inculcated toward rote responses in the face of ideas that might challenge the deep coding that undergirds corporate oligarchy and the global imperialist order.

    Ignorance and cynicism masquerade as being intelligent and shrewd. Hypocrisy a specie of cold-eyed realism.

Comments are closed.