Category Archives: Found in Translation

The Translator’s Tale, or What I Learned From Lupita

Well, today it finally became real. I have incontrovertible evidence that yes, I’m a professional translator now. And that makes me, in a sense, a published author with a byline, too. My contributor copies (ten in English, plus one of … Continue reading

Posted in Canadian Counterpunch, Confessions of a Bad German, Economics for Dummies, Filthy Stinking Rich, Found in Translation, If You REALLY Care, Isn't It Ironic?, Law-Law Land, Mexican Standoffs, Not So Compassionate Conservatism, Teh Ghey, The United States of Amnesia, Uppity Wimmin, Writer Lady Sings the Blues | 7 Comments

Ahem.

Notice anything here? That’s right, Your Humble Scribe is now a published translator, as well as author, poet, blogger, and general nogoodnik. And my genial publisher, Richard Grabman, is looking for people to review this work. We’re hoping to get … Continue reading

Posted in A Bit of a Brag..., Found in Translation, Mexican Standoffs, Uppity Wimmin, Writer Lady Sings the Blues | 7 Comments

Pole dancing: for aficionados, it’s serious stuff

Jenyne Butterfly shows what a world-champion pole dancer looks like. No platforms, no sequins, no lingerie, no raunch; just really good (and seriously sexy!) stuff. Yesterday, as part of my ongoing informal research into the world of a Mexican book … Continue reading

Posted in Found in Translation, Mexican Standoffs, Uppity Wimmin | 4 Comments

The art of the WHAT?

As I prepare to get cracking on my first-ever book-length Spanish-to-English translation (yes, congratulate me, kiddies, your auntie is going pro!), I found some videos while looking up an idiomatic phrase that just didn’t appear in either my Streetwise Spanish … Continue reading

Posted in Artsy-Fartsy Culture Stuff, Found in Translation, Uppity Wimmin, Writer Lady Sings the Blues | 3 Comments

Quotable: Simón Rodríguez on the importance of questioning everything

“Enseñe los niños a ser preguntones, para que, pidiendo el por qué, de lo que se les mande hacer, se acostumbren a obedecer… a la razón, no a la autoridad, como los limitados, ni a la costumbre, como los estúpidos.” … Continue reading

Posted in Found in Translation, Quotable Notables | Comments Off on Quotable: Simón Rodríguez on the importance of questioning everything

Quebec blogger murdered in Mexico

One of the last pictures published on Renée Wathelet’s blog, En direct des îles. “Jeux d’eau” (“water games”) is from her Flickr page.A very sad note from the Canadian blogosphere. Thanks to “Monmick”, who sent me this article in French … Continue reading

Posted in Found in Translation, Mexican Standoffs, Obits and 'bobs | 1 Comment

Bolivia terror plot: The Rózsa-Marinkovic “Ustasha Connection”

A World War II-era Ustasha propaganda poster, highlighting the connections between the Nazi SS and local tyrant Ante Pavelic.From ABI, an in-depth look at the connections behind the attempt on Evo’s life this past spring: Seven months and five days … Continue reading

Posted in All About Evo, Fascism Without Swastikas, Filthy Stinking Rich, Fine Young Cannibals, Found in Translation, Isn't That Illegal?, Law-Law Land | Comments Off on Bolivia terror plot: The Rózsa-Marinkovic “Ustasha Connection”

Economics for Dummies: Great Moments in Capitalism

Translation:“The problem is that people are buying too much!”“But wasn’t that the original idea?”“We used to be afraid that communists would destroy capitalism, but now the brokers are doing it!”

Posted in Economics for Dummies, Found in Translation | 1 Comment

Ratzi gets all medieval on our collective ass

Translation:“There hasn’t been a German pope since the Middle Ages…and now, it’s the Middle Ages all over again!”

Posted in Confessions of a Bad German, Found in Translation, Pissing Jesus Off | 3 Comments

Economics for Dummies: The “expert” opinion

Translation: “The IMF says the economy will fall to a level ‘below zero’!”“Oh, what experts these guys are!”“In economies?”“No–in making them fall!”

Posted in Economics for Dummies, Found in Translation | 3 Comments