A Children’s Treasury of Wingnuttia

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I don’t know what’s funnier…the fact that there’s a book for kids on the “virtues” of open carry, that it’s “frequently bought together” with other forgettable trashery like Raising Boys Feminists Will Hate, or these Amazon.com reviews for it:

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Yes indeed, this book is a classic in the making. I can smell it already. No, wait…that’s just burnt gunpowder and stale flop-sweat. My mistake!

Manuel Zelaya speaks out: “The president of Honduras is John Kerry”

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This man is the last true democratically elected president Honduras has had. Five years ago, he was deposed in a violent military putsch, backed to the hilt by Washington. Manuel Zelaya was sent into exile, very much against his will, and even more so against the will of the Honduran people. Ever since then, there’s been a campaign to silence all critics of the US-imposed puppet régimes (there have been three so far) in the wake of the coup. Sham elections have not been enough to buy off the populace, and criticism has been growing. This year, things came to a head when child refugees from Central America, thousands of them, began arriving at the border with Mexico, unaccompanied by adults, but often in possession of their birth certificates and other documents identifying them and their countries of origin. Honduras is heavily represented among those lands, and if you wonder why, let the last real president of the land explain it all to you:

A short time after the fifth anniversary of the coup d’état that brought down his government, former Honduran president Manuel Zelaya spoke with Miradas al Sur about the current situation in Honduras and Latin America.


Manuel Zelaya only began to be affectionately called “Mel” by large parts of the population of Honduras in the second half of his mandate as president there. Until then, and for a good part of the peoples of Latin America, he had only been the progressive face of the Honduran Liberal Party, one of the traditional axes of power in the Central American country. But as of 2008, his way of wielding power began to turn toward the creation of a state closer to the humble folk, and more disposed toward solidarity with the popular sectors not only of his own land, but of all the Caribbean. Zelaya put conservative noses out of joint, and even those of his own comrades, upon confirming the leftward turn of his government, with a 60% minimum wage increase and an explicit turn toward 20th-century socialism. That same year, and hand in hand with Hugo Chávez’s Venezuela, Honduras formally entered into Petrocaribe and the Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our America (ALBA). “Petrocaribe is a commercial alliance. ALBA is an alliance of Latin American integration. I entered into both. Those countries who want to establish another system for a world which is still possible, must join ALBA. Not just Petrocaribe. That is more for business dealings,” Zelaya explained.

But while a good part of Latin America and the Caribbean was drawing closer to “Mel”, there were some in Honduras and the United States who grieved for politicians like Zelaya, and even more for those who preceded him. So it was that on June 28, 2009, the armed forces, backed by the supreme court of the nation, carried out a coup d’état which did away with the progressive profile of Honduras. “The result of the coup was that the security apparatus or the economic apparatus or the economic system began to be 99% directed by policies designed in Washington,” said the former president. “And, lamentably, they are policies of the most reactionary right-wing elements in the United States, very sectarian groups of the far right. After the coup, narcotrafficking and crime increased. The exploitation of the transnational mining firms is deepening, the privatization of all public services such as roadways, ports, telecommunications. They’ve even privatized things that belong to civil society and the state, such as collecting customs duties. And one of the most classic forms that the North American right has for controlling our countries is militarism. Now, here, soldiers have been substituted for the police. They’re substituting for the powers of the state in all matters and have given them extraordinary powers, as if we were living in a de facto dictatorial state. The separation of powers disappeared. There’s just one power of state, which the president wields over the military. If we review all the indicators of the land, we will find that everything has deteriorated from the coup to the present. The internal and external debt has quintupled. In five years, they’ve managed to indebt the country like it was in the 1960s, and it’s the largest debt in our history. The murder rate has converted us into the most violent country on the planet. We were a small and peaceful country. We are the poorest society in Latin America. We have always been at some level of poverty, but never like it is now. The president of Honduras is not Juan Orlando Hernández; he was imposed by way of a fraud. The presidnet of Honduras is named John Kerry, and his policies are those of the United States.”

Following his removal from office, and after several months in exile, Zelaya joined the National Front of Popular Resistance, which became the party of Freedom and Refoundation (LIBRE), over which he presides today. In November of 2013, LIBRE participated in the presidential elections with Xiomara Castro, Zelaya’s wife, as candidate, reaching second place and breaking up the historic bipartisanism of the National Party and the Liberals.

A few weeks ago, Zelaya himself denounced that he had been repressed, along with all his party, at the doors of the National Congress.

“That incident is just one more proof of the militarization of the land, and its absorption in neoliberal politics,” Zelaya pointed out. And with respect to this point, he emphasized that “we have to get back to calling it neoliberalism. Because neoliberalism in itself was the monetary and fiscal control of a society, but now it has advanced in military politics, in looting and exploitation, in diseases, epidemics, pestilence, death. Now it’s a neoliberalism of disaster which is being applied here. We were expelled from the congress at bayonet-point, and with tear gas, because one of the characteristics of the governments of force is that they don’t accept the opposition. For them, the opposition has to disappear, and for that reason, they have to limit our access to the media. There is an exaggerated media blockade today in Honduras. We have no option to defend ourselves practically in any media outlet. Everything is against us. But we ourselves have grown stronger. We are much stronger than before, especially because the popular consciousness has grown in recognizing what affects us. We understand that the United States won’t go away; what we need is to have honest, respectful relations with them. Which is what we don’t have right now, because those currently governing [in Honduras] are those who duck their heads and bow down to serve Washington’s orders.”

In effect, as well as having an enormous weight in Honduran internal politics, the United STates are now the centre of a very deep international debate which affects Central American societies. In the last months, the phenomenon of child migration toward the northern country has taken on a worrisome importance, to the point where the affected countries are trying to begin joint actions to deal with it. In June alone, it is estimated that 2,000 Salvadoran, Honduran and Mexican children crossed the border into the United States every week.

“The problem is that the great powers were born of migration, but don’t want to recognize the migrants of the 20th and 21st centuries,” said Zelaya. “They are products of migration, but they close themselves off in an anti-historical nationalism because emigrating is a right, not a crime. We all have that right because we were born in a world which is shared among all, in one human race. Those who managed to get to those nations are telling them to take their children. And now they’re hunting those children without pity. Now the powers are on display before the world. Because first they deny their parents the right to be legalized, and now they’re persecuting the children. Just as at the time when Jesus was born, they’re ordering them to kill all the children who were born then so that no messiah can emerge. Worse than the persecutions of the holocaust. They’re persecuting children, torturing them, denying them the right to reunite with their families. This is not a humanitarian crisis, it’s a humanitarian crime of the neoliberal model against the poor of Latin America and Africa.”

Translation mine.

I have to admit that Mel Zelaya didn’t really appear on my radar until he joined the ALBA, which is the late Chavecito’s baby and which has been going from strength to strength even now, after his death. At first Mel seemed like just another too-conservative-for-my-liking leader, but when he began to demonstrate that his heart was in the right place and his feet were headed in a good direction, I was sold. Not only was Mel the last real president of Honduras, he was also unequivocally the best. Under him, the socioeconomic profile of that poor little country was beginning to rise. Poor people were getting access to social services that had been denied them before: doctors, schools, hospitals. Literacy was going up; poverty rates were beginning to fall. And all that, which should have been terrific news, was greeted by Washington in the kind of doomsday-prophet tones you’d expect in the advent of a Category 5 hurricane about to make landfall along the eastern seaboard.

Which, of course, the ALBA was. A hurricane of promise, hope and rapid improvement. A hurricane of mutual aid and regional autonomy. Countries that used to rely abjectly on foreign “aid” from the US and elsewhere began to stand up on their own feet, and walk unassisted. That was bad news for those who used to turn obscene profits from the poverty and dependency of those little Latin American lands. They were used to taking advantage of those poor, ill-educated, highly dependent folks — as cheap labor, cannon fodder for proxy wars, and houseboys to the empire. The fact that those same people were now becoming aware that they could be so much more than that did not sit well with Washington. Hence, the coup.

It gives me no satisfaction to see blowback arriving in the form it has taken. Child refugees are the most helpless and vulnerable of them all. Along the way, who knows how many have been robbed, raped, beaten and killed? The ones we hear about arriving in Texas and Arizona are the lucky ones, the ones that made it through in one piece.

Honduras is embroiled in a civil war, although the US media won’t report that. And the death squads that we thought had died out with the evil 1980s? They’re back with a vengeance. That’s why so many desperate Central American parents are sending their kids to the country which, in a massive and humorless irony, is the author of their misfortunes.

When will it all end? When democracy is restored in Honduras, of course. But for that to happen, first the sham “democracy” installed by Washington must be trashed and kicked to the curb. The last real president of the land has not finished his mandate, and the three impostors who were tapped to “replace” him know this full well.

So do the people of Honduras, and they are absolutely furious that their will has been trampled under the boots of a fascism that everyone except the “freedom-loving”, “democratic” country behind it is willing to call by its right name. Little wonder that they are willing to give up even their own children to place the problem back at the door of its source!

The ironies of the Venezuelan opposition, part 54

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Behold, a white horse. And a pale rider.

Good morning, and welcome to today’s installment of VenOpIronía. Today, we have a very special guest from Miami, where all the flotsam and jetsam of corrupt and failed Latin American right-wing political hackery has a funny way of washing ashore. Please give it up for yet another failed Venezuelan presidential candidate…this one having the unfortunate honor of being the first man to lose the presidential elections to Chavecito himself:

Henrique Salas Römer, ex-governor of the state of Carabobo and fugitive from Venezuelan justice, stated in an interview on a Miami channel that the “Exit” was a movement dreamed up by Leopoldo López, whom he called erratic and politically hasty.

Salas also confirmed that Henrique Capriles Radonski, if he had won the presidential elections, would not have been able to efficiently govern the country, and relegated the most minimal commentary to María Corina Machado, whom he only referred to as a “special” person. In Salas Römer’s words, political inexperience and bad time management have taken their toll on these three personages.

“Capriles is behind the wave, and it overthrew Leopoldo, and María Corina is a very special being,” was the ex-governor’s observation in describing the current situation of the most renowned directors of the the MUD.

Of Capriles, Salas says that he “was lucky, because he has been very fortunate in political life in not having won”, because he would not have been able to accurately exercise the presidency. That would have provoked the immediate loss of his followers and the confidence of an important sector of the citizenry in the opposition.

Salas Römer explained that the “Exit” was Leopoldo López’s initiative. “He took it because there was something which was called “La Movida” (The Happening)…They [Machado and López] were switching from one day to the next, changing the term “La Movida” to “La Salida” (The Exit), which I consider to have been a bit hasty.”

Finally, the fugitive Salas reiterated that he had no part in “The Exit”, as an extremist and radical movement, although he was in agreement with the protest as a means of opposition to the Bolivarian Revolution.

There is no doubt that Leopoldo López, national director of the terrorist cells of Voluntad Popular (Popular Will) is growing more isolated every day in the Venezuelan political panorama.

Translation mine.

You’ll notice in the picture at that top that Salas is mounted on a white horse. That was taken in 1998, during his flopped presidential campaign against Chavecito. Salas is trying hard to look, if not exactly youthful (to compete with handsome young Chavecito, who was quite the hottie in ’98), then at least macho and still relevant. Unfortunately for him, the gambit didn’t pay off. For one thing, a chubby old man waving his cowboy hat on a white horse is still just a chubby old man on a horse. For another, the horse’s name was Frijolito (Little Bean) — not exactly a dignified name for a great leader’s trusty steed. And last but certainly not least, Frijolito — sorry, Salas — was already tainted by virtue of being a member of the old Venezuelan political establishment. The same that the Bolivarian Revolution was then on the verge of sweeping out for good. But Salas, bless his heart, was blissfully unaware that Venezuelan politics had moved beyond clownish, superficial displays by then. And just as blissfully unaware that being a member of the political establishment was not enough to get the vote anymore. On the contrary, it was working against him, as he found out during his trouncing at the polls later that year.

That’s why it’s ironic and hilarious to hear him criticizing these young whippersnappers. All of them are just as much products of the old Punto Fijo/Fourth Republic political establishment as Salas himself, and all of them, no doubt, want the same things as he: an end to all this pesky socialism, and progress, and rich people like themselves being made to pay their taxes, and so on. Salas isn’t objecting to their silly anti-progressive agenda, but rather to their haste. As though a great leap backward could be accomplished by plodding. He’s totally clueless to the fact that these leaders all failed not just by being “hasty” (or “special”, in the case of that specialest of snowflakes Maricori), but because they are all right-wing, and because Venezuela is sick and tired of their shit. Sick of old-order politics-as-usual, in which votes were bought with cans of paint and bags of groceries in the poor neighborhoods; sicker still of neo-fascist putschism, and 24/7/365 hatemongering, violence and death. And sickest of all when it comes to all these talking heads bla-bla-blathering away, proposing “movements” and “happenings” and “exits” that are never going to get off the ground, no matter how many people have to die on either side. For them, Henrique Salas Römer is just a reanimated political corpse, and one that should have been buried long ago. The fact that he has to go to Miami to be taken seriously by a talk-show host should tell you all you need to know.

Honestly, Frijolito the horse stands a better chance of being taken seriously as an opposition political candidate. If he weren’t already tainted by an unfortunate association with Salas’s ass, that is.

It was 30 years ago today…

Then-US Secretary of Health, Margaret Heckler, announces the discovery of the virus that causes AIDS. Initially (mis)classified as a third member of the HTLV leukemia virus family (there were two others, both discovered by Robert Gallo), the virus later known as HIV is seen and described on TV for the first time. Also seen are clips from a few prominent AIDS deaths: Actor Rock Hudson, who kept his illness a secret until he had to seek treatment overseas; and Ryan White, an Indiana schoolboy born with hemophilia, who caught HIV from a tainted batch of Factor VIII, a coagulant made from donor blood. The clip closes with a view of the Names Project quilt, a massive tribute to the thousands who died of AIDS during the 1980s, when politicians all fiddled while victims — mostly gay men, but with a fast growing contingent of women and children — burned.

One can’t help wondering what would have happened if AIDS had been transmitted like flu — not sexually, not by blood contact, but simply through casual transmission, via the airborne route. I have no doubt that we’d be seeing a working vaccine for it now, instead of the continued foot-dragging that has characterized political response to the disease from the moment it first appeared on the public-health radar.

Happy Fourth of July!

“The Price of the World Cup” — dead children?

A Danish journalist has uncovered some shocking allegations about how the Brazilian cities where the World Cup matches are currently underway have chosen to “clean” their streets of homeless people, especially street kids. It forms part of an overall critical look at how the neo-corporatist World Cup agenda has run roughshod over the locals in those cities. Everything from cablecars being built over favelas where people have lived for decades, to insufferable gentrification, to allegations of death squads roaming the streets, gets an airing here. It really puts the lie to the common canard that Brazil is a “racial democracy”, since most of the suffering has been borne by the poor and non-white people of the land.

And the allegations of state-sanctioned murder squads, if true, signify a shocking holdover from the days of the US-backed military fascist dictatorship that seized power in a not-so-bloodless coup in 1964 and later murdered the legitimately elected president, João Goulart. The same that also kidnapped and tortured the current president, Dilma Rousseff, when she was a young Marxist guerrilla. Those kidnappers, torturers and murderers cut their teeth on homeless people even before the coup that unseated Goulart, receiving instruction in their ugly craft from US police and military officers and spies. And their methods clearly live on in the municipal police and armed forces of present-day Brazil. Remember this?

Dan Mitrione, the police torture instructor discussed in this short clip, was fictionalized slightly (as “Philip Michael Santore”) for the movie State of Siege. Before his posting to Uruguay, where he was captured and eventually executed by the Tupamaro guerrillas, Mitrione spent time in Brazil…and there is a memorably horrifying scene in that same movie showing naked men — beggars yanked off the streets — being tortured and electrocuted on stage in a massive lecture hall filled with military and police officers. Those same officers have not been cleansed out of the Brazilian police and armed forces; on the contrary, their methods have survived and flourished with complete impunity. In other words: In Brazil, Dan Mitrione still lives.

Every Brazilian who’s been asked about how they feel about the World Cup seems to say the same thing, whether it’s expats interviewed by the Deutsche Welle in Germany, or my Brazilian friends here on the other side of the pond. They love soccer, but they hate the World Cup and all the upheaval it brings, from gentrification to an uptick in child prostitution on the streets…and of course, death squads. All agree that the money spent on building and renovating big stadiums was a waste, and that it should have gone to social programs. Healthcare, education, social housing. And that street people and favela dwellers should not have been expelled and killed, as they apparently have been. But it would appear that local mayors — or perhaps we should say, local death-squad capos — disagree. Bullets are so much cheaper than giving some “worthless” street kid an education, food, a home, and a good job. Somehow, human beings just don’t merit that kind of consideration when there are big bucks at play on the soccer field.

It is shocking that a president who was once a victim of this same insanity could turn a blind eye to its continuation four decades later. Let’s hope that Dilma finally does something about this. Just don’t look for anything to start happening while the World Cup is still on.

Q. What do the Venezuelan opposition and Justin Bourque have in common?

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A. Oh, only this:

Yesterday in Moncton, a small city of about 70,000 inhabitants on the east coast of Canada, a young Canadian, 24 years old, carried out a massacre, murdering three police officers and wounding two more. While the police were searching for him — because they hadn’t been able to catch him yet — the people lived in terror, not knowing where or when he would reappear to kill someone else.

The same thing happened during the many weeks in certain cities in Venezuela during the attacks on the part of the opposition between February and May of this year, when young oppositionists took the streets, indiscriminately attacking and killing members of the security forces, and innocent people, terrorizing them.

The similarities are really suprising.

One newspaper says that the 24-year-old Canadian was in the habit of uploading photos and texts related to US militias, armed anticommunist and racist groups of the far right, in the manner of fascist political parties of the Venezuelan opposition and their armed groups. And photos of Sarah Palin, a US political leader, racist and anticommunist, of the extreme right, in the manner of Venezuelan opposition leader María Corina Machado.

But the most intriguing thing the newspaper says is that the young Canadian had it in his head that Russia was going to invade Canada. This makes no sense. Russia has no interest in invading Canada — that’s a fantasy on the part of those racist, anticommunist groups of the far right, and people like Sarah Palin — and if for any reason, the young man thought that Russia was a communist country, and wanted to invade Canada for that reason, that young man is very much mistaken.

Russia is not a communist country, and most people with half a brain know that, but due to irrational hatred for communism on the part of certain criminal groups, and extremist anticommunist racist militias, the minds of many young people are being filled with fantasies and lies, creating in them fear, panic and paranoia as well, which could change at some time — and has changed — into indiscriminate violence.

In parallel to the above, one of the most important slogans of María Corina Machado, and almost all the Venezuelan opposition, is that Cuba will invade Venezuela, and for that reason they have to get rid of this government, in whatever way they can. That’s totally illogical, it’s a fantasy invented by the Venezuelan opposition. How could a country so small, and with so few weapons, think of invading a country as large as Venezuela, which has many weapons? And why would they want to invade Venezuela if we are collaborators and allies? Could it be that the Venezuelan opposition believe that Cuba will invade Venezuela to turn it into a communist country?

The truth is that neither Chávez, nor Maduro, nor any Chavista I have ever heard speaking, has ever talked of trying to transform Venezuela into a communist state; that would be totally ridiculous. Generally, what we Chavistas want is not communism as such, and much less the Cuban style or that of the old Soviet Union, but rather a state which is more just and equitable, more feminist, and not machista; more humanistic, more empathetic, which is to say, more socialist. That’s all. And that has nothing to do with ay imaginary Cuban communism invented by brain-sick opposition leaders like María Corina Machado, or other misbegotten leaders of the Venezuelan opposition, who keep teaching lies and fantasies to young opposition menbers, creating in them as well hatred, panic and paranoia, which could turn at any moment — and has turned — into indiscriminate violence.

The similarities are truly surprising.

Just as Sarah Palin and other racist, anticommunist groups of the US far right have contaminated the soul of the young Canadian of 24 years, leading to gratuitous violence, María Corina Machado and other racist anticommunist far-right groups of the Venezuelan opposition, who make up the majority of the opposition, also follow the principles responsible for the poisoning of the spirits of many young Venezuelans, bringing them as well to that gratuitous violence.

Translation mine.

That was Oscar Heck talking, BTW. He’s of Canadian extraction himself, so he knows a thing or two about the similarities between fascists here and fascists there. His bio states: “Born to a French-Canadian father and an indigenous mother, he came to Venezuela for the first time during the 1970s, where he worked as a missionary in the barrios of Caracas and Barlovento.” In other words, he’s had four decades to observe the conditions on the ground in that country. And ample cause, considering the poverty he’s seen and worked amid, to support the Bolivarian Revolution.

And yes, I agree with him; Justin Bourque has all the hallmarks of an NRA-influenced fascist. His Facebook page shows him to be quite the paranoid gunsucker. Teaching children to fire guns, as he repeatedly endorses, is just what the Nazis did, too; they had gun-clubs in the Hitler Youth. The irony is that he came of age during the era of Stephen Harper, a head of state who couldn’t be less like Chavecito or Madurito if he tried. And whose holy crusade was to abolish the long-gun registry…thereby making it that much harder for the RCMP to know where Bourque got the guns that killed their officers. To say that the police in this country are sour on Harpo is putting it very mildly. Not because they’re such redder-than-red communists themselves, though; the RCMP has a long history of spying on anything to the left of, well, the Conservatives. Harpo’s party, that is. And for decades, they’ve made a point of infiltrating every leftish group, from environmentalists and Native activists to the various socialist parties, and even spied on Tommy Douglas himself. There’s certainly an authoritarian history in the RCMP, but it leans hard to the right, not the left. So there’s another layer of irony to this madness. The cryptofascist cop-killer wanted RCMP officers dead, but in truth, he has more in common with them, insofar as anticommunist paranoia goes, than he could ever have dreamed of.

Which brings us to the Venezuelan opposition. If you’ve been following this blog, particularly the 50-odd entries detailing their various ironies, you’ll know just how deaf they are to their own ironic fascism, and how much they ARE the very thing they claim to be against. They scream about a lack of free speech on the 95% of the nation’s media that they outright own. They call for putsches and assassinations just about daily, which is illegal here in Canada, BTW. They import paramilitary goons from neighboring Colombia to help them with their coup attempts. Their hooded thugs terrorize the streets with guns imported from the good ol’ US of A (thanks again, NRA gunsuckers!), and they have the gall to claim there’s no public safety or order there. They kill Chavistas, and they have made countless attempts on the lives of their two Bolivarian presidents, not to mention countless lesser politicians who supported them. And they have the temerity to claim they are the ones being repressed? Yeah. Spot the ironies, they are thicker than blackflies on the ass of a New Brunswick moose.

And so are the similarities between them and this guy.

The only thing that can stop a bad guy with a gun…

…is a good guy with a lasso:

In case you can’t see the video, here’s the basic gist:

According to The Atlanta Journal Constitution, deputies said that 25-year-old Celestino Moras showed up drunk at a rodeo in Bartow County on Sunday, and was asked to leave because he was not invited to the event.

The property owner told WSB-TV that Moras pulled out a pistol and opened fire, leaving three shot.

When Moras ran out of bullets, one of the rodeo cowboys reportedly lassoed him. Moras was then beaten by other guests, who tied him up until deputies arrived.

Authorities said that two people were shot in the lower body, and one person was shot in the neck. However, WSB-TV reported that “the three wounded guests suffered only minor injuries and were treated and released from local hospitals.”

A fourth person suffered cuts on the hand from a knife.

Moral of story: Never bring a gun to a knife fight at the OK Corral. Or something like that.

Yee-haw!

Maria Conchita Alonso’s latest load of bat guano

Oh, oh…what have we here?

Poor dear. It sounds like she’s trying to sing. She’s not doing a very good job. But then again, there are a lot of things Conchita isn’t very good at. Like acting, for example. Or, hell…just acting like a friggin’ human being. Take, for example, this:

Cuban-Venezuelan actress María Conchita Alonso, now a US citizen, has said that she would like for the United States to invade Venezuela “with bullets to get all those damn communists out” of the country.

That was how she put it during an interview on “La Voz de América”, in an audio clip rebroadcast curing the VTV show “Con el Mazo Dando”, hosted by the president of the Venezuelan national assembly, Diosdado Cabello. The clip was also tweeted by the minister of communication and information, Delcy Rodríguez.

On the clip, Alonso, who was born in Cuba but emigrated to Venezuela at a young age, said that what was happening in Venezuela “has repercussions in all of Latin America and even in the United States”.

For that reason, she considers it “very important” to impose sanctions on Venezuela, and proposed “taking visas away from Chavistas, who have been indoctrinated for years, as in Cuba, against this country, but who come here (to the US) and buy houses, horses, and everything.”

The actress added that another sanction should be to freeze their bank accounts, “since this money isn’t theirs, it belongs to Venezuelans.”

“In my opinion, invade the country, since the Cubans invaded without firing a shot, because they’re handing Venezuela over to Cuba, I want the United States to invade with bullets to get all those damn communists out of Venezuela,” said the actress.

Regarding those declarations, Communication and Information minister Delcy Rodríguez stated on her website that “beyond the worrisome threat of invasion to Venezuela, even more serious is the complicity of self-exiled Venezuelans in Miami.” Such is the case, she says, of María Conchita Alonso, “who, rending her garments out of a false love of her country, irresponsibly incites the invasion of the US Marines.”

“We all know the harmful consequences which a North American military invasion would bring about in our land. If we consider the lived experiences of Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, and Syria, we know that a gringo military invasion would affect the entire nation, and the family lives of the people would be destroyed,” said the minister.

Translation mine. Linkage added.

So we can see that here is another so-called Venezuelan who doesn’t give a shit if the country she claims to love (in such terrible songs) is invaded and destroyed by the US war machine. In fact, as it stands, Conchita doesn’t care that her beloved “freedom-loving” opposition is holding the country for ransom, and has killed at least 40 people in the latest round of violence alone. No, she won’t be happy, and she won’t consider Venezuela free and peaceful, until an overwhelming majority of Venezuelans are shot and killed. For, after all, six out of every ten Venezuelans are Chavistas.

And as we can see, her idea of “freedom” is strange even in the US, where the so-called Venezuelan exiles are anti-Chavista, and in any case, those are the only ones rich enough to buy “houses, horses and everything”. The others, who immigrated due to dire poverty back before Chávez, and who support the Revolution because they remember what life used to be like there, are invisible. They don’t count. After all, they live in the inner cities, indistinguishable from all the other poor, brown Latinos. Does she want to see THEIR bank accounts frozen? There’s not much in them to freeze. Maybe she should call for the freezing of rich “exile” bank accounts, instead. But no, that would be an infringement on good ol’ Murrican freedumb…

As for the part about that money belonging to the Venezuelan people…well, duh! It belongs to the people who brought it, and they do so happen to be Venezuelan. But I don’t hear her saying boo about Jota-Jota. Maybe because his money doesn’t come from Venezuela, but from the Colombian drug trade (among other things)? Maybe. I guess it doesn’t deserve to be part of the latest hypocritical round of sanctions, called for by right-wing dunderheads like Marco “The Clown” Rubio and Bob “The John” Menendez.

And of course, let’s not forget that Conchita’s brother Robert (not Roberto, ROBERT) has a long and extensive history of putschist activities…and an ocean of innocent Venezuelan blood on his hands.

In any case, she has some nerve, clamoring for invasion out of supposed love for a country she hasn’t actually been in for longer than she claims to have been watching it go to hell. “Hell”, of course, being a vast improvement over what it used to be when Conchita was still squatting there.

J.J. Rendón and the dirty politics of Latin American narcotrafficking

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“I have ties to narcotrafficking? Those are just rumors!” Sure, Jota-Jota…we believe you.

The more one looks at Juan José Rendón, the more this silly “samurai” takes on a sinister overtone. Because according to J.M. Karg, a journalist based in Buenos Aires, wherever Jota-Jota goes, drug money is not far behind:

Following the recent denunciation of ties between political advisor J.J. Rendón and Colombian narcos, which resulted in Rendón’s withdrawal from the re-election campaign of Colombian president Juan Manuel Santos, Latin American public opinion once more debates the relationship between two worlds that seem separate, but whose interrelatedness continues to grow: politics and narcotrafficking. Which directors have been questioned over probable ties with money stemming from this merchandise? And why is the collaboration between these two spheres increasing?

It is known that the world of narcotrafficking and its lavish generation of monetary liquidity at low cost and amazing speed, has brought various political campaigns to involve themselves with this wasteland of illegality. Some leaders seem to prefer to pay the political cost which the revelation of this connection could signify, as long as they have important funds to compete in elections, whether internal — within their own party — or general — for executive and or/legislative offices in each country. On the other hand, it guarantees a certain juridical “impunity” to be able to operate, creating a kind of “virtuous circle” in which both parties benefit in the short term. The problem, clearly, is the revelation in the medium to long term, and its possible juridico-mediatic repercussions, to the point where political careers end or those involved go directly to prison.

The Colombian capo, Javier Antonio Calle, was the one who revealed, from the United States, that Rendón had received, over the last three years, $12 million from the three biggest narcotraffickers in Colombia, supposedly to get an agreement for surrender in exchange for no extradition [to the US], from the Santos government for them. The non-consummation of the plan does not negate Calle’s revelation: the ties between Rendón and these events, now under investigation by Colombian justice.

Do these facts soil only the campaign of Juan Manuel Santos? In no way. Rendón has advised, during these years, a handful of well-known political leaders in various countries: Peña Nieto in Mexico, Capriles in Venezuela, Juan Orlando Hernández in Honduras, Santos himself — and also Uribe — in Colombia, De Narváez in Argentina, and Quijano in El Salvador. If the current denunciation comes at a time of collaboration between Rendón and Santos, this revelation indirectly taints all those leaders, who also share a conservative vision in the politico-economic ambit. Why? No relation of this type comes overnight, and the hypothesis that Rendón had begun in these last few months to have dealings of this sort is certainly not very factual — or credible.

Two cases can serve as examples to illustrate what we have said. Firstly, the declaration of a former DEA chief in Mexico, Phil Jordan, who, following the arrest of the narco-capo “Chapo” Guzmán, appeared surprised by the case, saying that “I never thought that the PRI [party] would arrest him, because ‘Chapo’ Guzmán gave a lot of money to the Peña Nieto campaign. He has always been involved in politics by way of money.” After that, Jordan stated that the ties between Guzmán and the PRI are documented in US intelligence reports. The circle appears to close: Rendón has been heavily involved as advisor to the Peña Nieto presidential campaign.

Secondly, the parliamentary deputy Francisco de Narváez was investigated by Argentine authorities for his suspected ties to Mario Roberto Segovia, of Rosario, sentenced in 2012 to 14 years in prison for 91 shipments of ephedrine to Mexico. What happened next? Years later, from a telephone registered to De Narváez, three cellphone calls were made to Segovia, according to a report by the newspaper La Capital de Rosario. While testifying as a witness in the case, De Narváez said he did not make those calls, although he admitted that the telephone from which they were made did indeed belong to a group of them registered to him, thus recognizing the connection indirectly. Who advised De Narváez during the 2011 campaign? J.J. Rendón, of course.

Following these new revelations over Rendón, there remain many open questions about the connectionsn between the “narco” world and the politics of our continent, a complex, non-linear relationship with unpredictable consequences in the medium and long term, with the political and media sensitivity which these cases generate. Certainly, for every revelation made in the matter, such as those we describe in this article, numerous other connections are not visible; in this way, the various directors are “protected” from the possible media and judicial implications which new revelations could bring to bear. Is it possible, in the judicial ambit alone, to regulate the linkage between both spheres, with the goal of putting an end to a phenomenon which seems to have spread throughout the continent? Will the interrelation keep growing, assuring “mutual benefits” to all parties?

Translation mine.

So it’s not only in Colombia that drug money has been tied to Rendón’s “political” work. Argentina and Mexico, likewise, have seen him tied to politicians with well-established drug connections. Is it really so shocking, then, that a group of well-heeled Colombian narcotraffickers have seen fit to call on him to act as go-between in their attempts to negotiate with the local government?

And just to underscore how serious the charges against Rendón are, now there’s word out of Venezuela that he’s under investigation for money-laundering, as announced by attorney-general Luisa Ortega Díaz.

Gee, for mere “rumors”, there sure is a lot to substantiate all that idle gossip!